Monday, July 28, 2014
fuckyeahsexcriminals:

How many Brimpers are interested in that?
https://twitter.com/mattfraction/status/493546366753583104

Just kissing? Anal or GTFO.

fuckyeahsexcriminals:

How many Brimpers are interested in that?

https://twitter.com/mattfraction/status/493546366753583104

Just kissing? Anal or GTFO.

Sunday, July 27, 2014
sebpatrick:

kierongillen:

One more photo from the Wedding.
Yes.
(It’s a WW1 era Turkish sword that was in the Bride’s family. Incredibly beautiful close up.)

Well, given this weekend’s news, someone had to:

sebpatrick:

kierongillen:

One more photo from the Wedding.

Yes.

(It’s a WW1 era Turkish sword that was in the Bride’s family. Incredibly beautiful close up.)

Well, given this weekend’s news, someone had to:

One more photo from the Wedding.
Yes.
(It’s a WW1 era Turkish sword that was in the Bride’s family. Incredibly beautiful close up.)

One more photo from the Wedding.

Yes.

(It’s a WW1 era Turkish sword that was in the Bride’s family. Incredibly beautiful close up.)

jamesthegill said: Given your announcement about working on Darth Vader (congratulations for that, btw), at what point will Phonogram III start using the subtitle North Korean Democracy?

I’ve written all of Phonogram 3: The Immaterial Girl. Nothing I’m writing now affects the release of it in any way whatsoever.

And thank you.

Anonymous said: I'm listening to Wicdiv-inspired 8track playlists while sketching new original characters, which shall hopefully get me back into writing. Let's buckle down and hope I can finally muster up something like a work ethic.

Link them up, anonymous!

And yes, onwards! Let’s see if we can all be powerful keyboard heroes for the rest of the year.

Anonymous said: IS YOUR FRIEND WEARING A RED WEDDING SHIRT OMG MR. GILLEN'S FRIEND TOO SOON MUCH TOO SOON *sobs and scrolls through Catelyn Stark tag*

My brother’s taste in T-shirts is amazing.

As I was leaving my Brother’s wedding, the news broke at SDCC that I’d be writing the ongoing DARTH VADER book. Salvador Larroca draws, Adi Granov on the lovely cover above. In Canon, set between A NEW HOPE and EMPIRE.
(We did talk about maybe doing a live link up from the Wedding for the panel, but clearly midnight at a wedding in Scotland does involve the risk of a lot of men in kilts displaying their wares live to a horrified audience across the Pacific.)
Anyway - I got in last night, and tried to work out what to tweet about it. I ended up saying “So. As announced at SDCC, I’m doing a DARTH VADER book. What can I say? I fear it’s the mainstream comic book I was born to write.”  Which still suspect sounds about right, y’know? I’ve been basically writing Villain books on the sly since I’ve been at Marvel. Time to really go for it.
Let’s pull a relatively restrained quote from the CBR interview which basically explains how the  book operates…

So at the end of the first “Star Wars” film he’s the sole survivor of the greatest military disaster of all time. And more importantly he let the Rebels escape with the plans! He chose to let them escape with the plans. There are lots of people to blame for the Death Star. It’s not like it’s just Darth’s fault, but he certainly foots some of the blame.
Then the next time we see him in “Empire” he’s more powerful than ever. He treats people in “Empire” with more contempt than he treats them in “A New Hope.” So something happens between those two films. There is the question of what the destruction of the Death Star actually created. So this story is basically the fall and rise of Darth Vader and all the things that happen along the way. That’s why it interests me.
When I talk about this I tend to use the film “The Godfather” as a reference in terms of how it worked and that it featured a villain protagonist who we’re still interested in. The second reference I use is “House of Cards.” This is a man who is an incredibly powerful member of an organization and he feels he is being slighted. This is him choosing and being forced to do things he maybe wouldn’t have done originally and to rebuild and change his power situation.

Anyway - lots more interviews, and out next February.
CBRComics AllianceMarvel.comStarWars.comBleedingCoolUSA Today
And, yes, this is the one I left Iron Man to do. I think you’ll like it.

As I was leaving my Brother’s wedding, the news broke at SDCC that I’d be writing the ongoing DARTH VADER book. Salvador Larroca draws, Adi Granov on the lovely cover above. In Canon, set between A NEW HOPE and EMPIRE.

(We did talk about maybe doing a live link up from the Wedding for the panel, but clearly midnight at a wedding in Scotland does involve the risk of a lot of men in kilts displaying their wares live to a horrified audience across the Pacific.)

Anyway - I got in last night, and tried to work out what to tweet about it. I ended up saying “So. As announced at SDCC, I’m doing a DARTH VADER book. What can I say? I fear it’s the mainstream comic book I was born to write.”  Which still suspect sounds about right, y’know? I’ve been basically writing Villain books on the sly since I’ve been at Marvel. Time to really go for it.

Let’s pull a relatively restrained quote from the CBR interview which basically explains how the  book operates…

So at the end of the first “Star Wars” film he’s the sole survivor of the greatest military disaster of all time. And more importantly he let the Rebels escape with the plans! He chose to let them escape with the plans. There are lots of people to blame for the Death Star. It’s not like it’s just Darth’s fault, but he certainly foots some of the blame.

Then the next time we see him in “Empire” he’s more powerful than ever. He treats people in “Empire” with more contempt than he treats them in “A New Hope.” So something happens between those two films. There is the question of what the destruction of the Death Star actually created. So this story is basically the fall and rise of Darth Vader and all the things that happen along the way. That’s why it interests me.

When I talk about this I tend to use the film “The Godfather” as a reference in terms of how it worked and that it featured a villain protagonist who we’re still interested in. The second reference I use is “House of Cards.” This is a man who is an incredibly powerful member of an organization and he feels he is being slighted. This is him choosing and being forced to do things he maybe wouldn’t have done originally and to rebuild and change his power situation.

Anyway - lots more interviews, and out next February.

CBR
Comics Alliance
Marvel.com
StarWars.com
BleedingCool
USA Today

And, yes, this is the one I left Iron Man to do. I think you’ll like it.

Scotland.

Scotland.

cnricochet:

Surprise cosplay! I went to the XX Girls and Men vs. Cosplay party at SDCC dressed as Amaterasu from The Wicked + The Divine (Image Comics, 2014). For a last-minute rush job, I feel so happy with this costume!

cnricochet:

Surprise cosplay! I went to the XX Girls and Men vs. Cosplay party at SDCC dressed as Amaterasu from The Wicked + The Divine (Image Comics, 2014). For a last-minute rush job, I feel so happy with this costume!

comicsalliance:

‘ANGELA: ASGARD’S ASSASSIN’ CREATORS ON THE SCARIEST WOMAN IN THE GALAXY [INTERVIEW]
By Andy Khouri
Created in the early ’90s by Todd McFarlane and Neil Gaiman in the pages of Image Comics’ Spawn, Angela is a supremely violent immortal warrior/hunter/angel/naked woman, sent to Earth to slay Hellspawn as a soldier in the war between Heaven and Hell.
Or at least, she was. As a consequence of litigation whose transcript word counts are in excess of every Marvel comic ever published in history (not really), Angela is now something and and perhaps someone else. Who that is remains a question — an unexpectedly compelling question. Indeed, some longtime comics fans were bemused by Marvel’s heavily promoted induction of a character created not just with another comic book publisher, but by McFarlane himself, one of Marvel’s most famous creative “defectors.” Not to mention the fact that in the character’s entire history, she’d appeared in just a handful of comics, only four of which by written by Gaiman, and the last of those came out 20 years ago.
That readers were meant to accept the stated importance of Angela on little more than Marvel’s marketing say so seemed like a tough sell, but the twists kept coming. She became a surprisingly major part of Brian Michael Bendis’ Guardians of the Galaxy cast. A half-naked angel running around in space with a talking raccoon, yes, but somehow it worked. It was later revealed that Angela’s the daughter of Odin and sister to Thor, and was just heretofore unseen while she lived in a distant realm (that we like to call the McFarlaverse). And that works, too.
Now Marvel is committing fully to Angela with the character’s first ongoing series, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, which comes with yet more surprises. It’s a solo title starring a female lead, which of course is still rare in American superhero comics, and it’s also drawn by Phil Jimenez, whose long association with certain amazon princesses and other distinctly powerful women characters sends a very loud and clear message about Marvel’s intentions for Angela.
Joining Jimenez is writer Kieron Gillen, himself one of Marvle’s most acclaimed Asgardian scholars, if you will, having done very well regarded runs on Journey Into Mystery and Thor. Also writing Angela is Marguerite Bennett, who’s penned numerous books for DC and other publishers, but who this year landed two ongoings in the form of Angela and the recently announced Sleepy Hollow. As part of the book’s unique “stories-within-stories” structure that you’ll read about below, Bennett will collaborate with noted cover artist and illustrator Stephanie Hans, who’s making a relatively rare visit to the realm of sequential storytelling to help make Angela that much more distinct.
ComicsAlliance spoke with all four creators and series editor Wil Moss about the endlessly impressive surprise that is Angela.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

‘ANGELA: ASGARD’S ASSASSIN’ CREATORS ON THE SCARIEST WOMAN IN THE GALAXY [INTERVIEW]

By Andy Khouri

Created in the early ’90s by Todd McFarlane and Neil Gaiman in the pages of Image Comics’ Spawn, Angela is a supremely violent immortal warrior/hunter/angel/naked woman, sent to Earth to slay Hellspawn as a soldier in the war between Heaven and Hell.

Or at least, she was. As a consequence of litigation whose transcript word counts are in excess of every Marvel comic ever published in history (not really), Angela is now something and and perhaps someone else. Who that is remains a question — an unexpectedly compelling question. Indeed, some longtime comics fans were bemused by Marvel’s heavily promoted induction of a character created not just with another comic book publisher, but by McFarlane himself, one of Marvel’s most famous creative “defectors.” Not to mention the fact that in the character’s entire history, she’d appeared in just a handful of comics, only four of which by written by Gaiman, and the last of those came out 20 years ago.

That readers were meant to accept the stated importance of Angela on little more than Marvel’s marketing say so seemed like a tough sell, but the twists kept coming. She became a surprisingly major part of Brian Michael Bendis’ Guardians of the Galaxy cast. A half-naked angel running around in space with a talking raccoon, yes, but somehow it worked. It was later revealed that Angela’s the daughter of Odin and sister to Thor, and was just heretofore unseen while she lived in a distant realm (that we like to call the McFarlaverse). And that works, too.

Now Marvel is committing fully to Angela with the character’s first ongoing series, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, which comes with yet more surprises. It’s a solo title starring a female lead, which of course is still rare in American superhero comics, and it’s also drawn by Phil Jimenez, whose long association with certain amazon princesses and other distinctly powerful women characters sends a very loud and clear message about Marvel’s intentions for Angela.

Joining Jimenez is writer Kieron Gillen, himself one of Marvle’s most acclaimed Asgardian scholars, if you will, having done very well regarded runs on Journey Into Mystery and Thor. Also writing Angela is Marguerite Bennett, who’s penned numerous books for DC and other publishers, but who this year landed two ongoings in the form of Angela and the recently announced Sleepy Hollow. As part of the book’s unique “stories-within-stories” structure that you’ll read about below, Bennett will collaborate with noted cover artist and illustrator Stephanie Hans, who’s making a relatively rare visit to the realm of sequential storytelling to help make Angela that much more distinct.

ComicsAlliance spoke with all four creators and series editor Wil Moss about the endlessly impressive surprise that is Angela.

READ MORE