Saturday, July 19, 2014

Anonymous said: Would you ever write rumpypumpy into a graphic novel? Or do you think there's a lot to be said for leaving such things to the imagination of the reader?

I’d never write rumpypumpy, but I’m totally up for writing fucking.

Depends on the book and the intent. There’s sex scenes in the first issue of Phonogram: Rue Britannia. The Singles Club ends with a sex scene. There’s sex scenes in Uber, with a very different tone. It’d surprise me if a sex scene doesn’t turn up in WicDiv at some point.

(Some of the cast being 17 prevents them being in one, of course.)

ramsayfuckingbolton said: I'm really surprised that Monkey Gone to Heaven by the Pixies wasn't on the wicdiv playlist since Tame from the same album was. Did you think of that song?

It may find its way on there eventually. Like pretty much every man of my age and aesthetics, I’m an enormous Pixies fan. They’re the only band who I’ve ever travelled to an entirely different country to see specifically.

Tame found its way on there due to its very precise timbre, and how it speaks to a certain character’s nature. A big part of her was directly inspired by the universe implicit in the Pixie’s records - sci-fi Southern inbred horror and screaming, translated to a very different mythology. Tame is a song which particularly leans heavily on that mood. 

(I mean, the ending with Kim doing her ice cold distant ah-ha-ha’s while Frank is destroying the world? That’s the character right there.)

Monkey Gone To Heaven is the Pixies is them in their Stadium Rock mode, which isn’t my preferred Pixies Mode, but it’s undeniably one of their best songs. I’m always surprised by how many people love it don’t actually realise it’s an Environmental record, y’know? And obviously the build up to GOD! IS SEVEN! GOD IS SEVEN! is astounding. Plus “Rock me, Joe.”

Anonymous said: Do you think that Phonogram could work with blues or 70s rock? I like the concept a lot, I like the storytelling, characters, art... unfortunately I just don't like britpop (well, with the exception of Oasis). Not that I will actually write blues phonogram fanfiction... just wondering.

Rue Britannia’s plot is pretty much translatable to any musical movement. We tried to use specifics to talk about general systemic processes.

(We often joked that if there ever was a film of Rue Britannia, they’d move it to Seattle and make it about grunge. It wasn’t really a joke, as they could do it, and it’d still work, in a similar way to that HIGH FIDELITY worked.)

Anonymous said: Mr. Gillen, that is not a real panda.

WTF!?!??!! REALLY?!?!??!!

abigailbrady:

Pretty much every part of Wicked + Divine #2 is set in a real location.  One of them is the Romantics Room at the National Portrait Gallery. Kieron even wrote the scene there, although I’m not sure how, as there were no seats in the room when I visited on Thursday.  I took this sneaky photo after I’d taken notes in case I got thrown out, me having had run ins with the NPG before.
I was looking for clues.  alwaysalreadyangry pointed out that the Shelley and Byron pictures in WicDiv #2 were based on the real ones.  But they are different.  The portrait of Mary Shelley in the NPG does not have a ponytail, winged ears, or ravens; and the one of Byron does not have him dressed all in red with a goatee.
We know Byron is Satan from Cass saying that Luci is the latest incarnation of “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know" (this quote is one of about five facts I know about Byron and has been burned into my brain since a teacher described me as such at school).  We can infer that Mary Shelley is Woden, who is Odin’s English analogue (the ravens being equivalent to Hugin and Munin).  That leaves Percy Shelley, on the right, looking rather similar to the original, which is quite goffic.  Is he the Morrigan?  (I’d originally thought Mary was the Morrigan, because there is really None More Goth than writing Frankenstein, is there?  But Woden makes more sense.)
Since I was there I had a look at the rest of the sequence.  The other portraits, less prominently featured, are Humphry Davy (in the next room), Francis Chantrey, Princess Charlotte on the first page of the sequence; J. M. W. Turner (and a corner of William Blake) on the second; and on the last we have John Clare, Robert Bakewell and Edward Jenner in the first panel and William Wordsworth, Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas Paine.  None of these seem different in the same way as Shelley and Byron.  A couple are completely different colours, but that might just be Matt not having reference.  It is possible to overanalyse these things.  (It is possible I reached that point some time ago.)
You can find online versions of all these portraits at the NPG website, or go in and visit.  The standing exhibits are free, although they solicit donations.

abigailbrady:

Pretty much every part of Wicked + Divine #2 is set in a real location.  One of them is the Romantics Room at the National Portrait Gallery. Kieron even wrote the scene there, although I’m not sure how, as there were no seats in the room when I visited on Thursday.  I took this sneaky photo after I’d taken notes in case I got thrown out, me having had run ins with the NPG before.

I was looking for clues.  alwaysalreadyangry pointed out that the Shelley and Byron pictures in WicDiv #2 were based on the real ones.  But they are different.  The portrait of Mary Shelley in the NPG does not have a ponytail, winged ears, or ravens; and the one of Byron does not have him dressed all in red with a goatee.

We know Byron is Satan from Cass saying that Luci is the latest incarnation of “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know" (this quote is one of about five facts I know about Byron and has been burned into my brain since a teacher described me as such at school).  We can infer that Mary Shelley is Woden, who is Odin’s English analogue (the ravens being equivalent to Hugin and Munin).  That leaves Percy Shelley, on the right, looking rather similar to the original, which is quite goffic.  Is he the Morrigan?  (I’d originally thought Mary was the Morrigan, because there is really None More Goth than writing Frankenstein, is there?  But Woden makes more sense.)

Since I was there I had a look at the rest of the sequence.  The other portraits, less prominently featured, are Humphry Davy (in the next room), Francis Chantrey, Princess Charlotte on the first page of the sequence; J. M. W. Turner (and a corner of William Blake) on the second; and on the last we have John Clare, Robert Bakewell and Edward Jenner in the first panel and William Wordsworth, Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas Paine.  None of these seem different in the same way as Shelley and Byron.  A couple are completely different colours, but that might just be Matt not having reference.  It is possible to overanalyse these things.  (It is possible I reached that point some time ago.)

You can find online versions of all these portraits at the NPG website, or go in and visit.  The standing exhibits are free, although they solicit donations.

foxesforsale:


You spend all your life wishing you were special. And then you find out you are.

Loving The Wicked + The DIvine, it’s a gorgeous new comic. Argh, what I’ve give to be able to download something better to draw with, hotel internet sucks. OneNote carrying me as far as it can…

foxesforsale:

You spend all your life wishing you were special. And then you find out you are.

Loving The Wicked + The DIvine, it’s a gorgeous new comic. Argh, what I’ve give to be able to download something better to draw with, hotel internet sucks. OneNote carrying me as far as it can…

tardiscrash:

daily sketch 199: luci
You ever just see a character in a book and you know that this is going to be the one you are stupidly in love with for the rest of the story?
So yeah. The Wicked and the Divine is amazing, you should all read it.

tardiscrash:

daily sketch 199: luci

You ever just see a character in a book and you know that this is going to be the one you are stupidly in love with for the rest of the story?

So yeah. The Wicked and the Divine is amazing, you should all read it.

n-a-blue-box:

deepbreathsanddeath:

This is a real panda
China has this “panda diplomacy” and this one will be sent to Japan as an friendship envoy. For the safety reason he sits as a passenger with his feeder, not in a cage. Fastening the seat belt, wearing a diaper, eating bamboos

this makes me really happy

Typical pandering.